Caffeine Tom on hating movies

Caffeine Tom on hating movies


Oi, niece, nephew, get in here. Sit down, I need to talk to you. What’s that, a camera? Need me to fix it? Do you know much about the broad state of
online film criticism in 2018? Perfect. Have you ever watched cinemasins? Perfect. And keep it that way. Look I brought you in here to talk to you
about some people out there who seem to hate more films than they love. And I’m just… you know, I mean what’s up with
that? Films and filmmakers seem to be getting more
hate than ever, though I’m aware it’s probably just a vocal minority magnified by
social media. But it’s quite a phenomenon. In a world with CinemaSins and pessimistic
junk like that, it’s like hating stuff has become a hobby. Now there are some wonderful anti-CinemaSins
videos out there, so I don’t need to rail against CinemaSins, but honestly I just struggle
to understand the satisfaction that so many people find in disliking art. You know what is it? Does it make them feel
superior? Or maybe audiences’ expectations of what
movies ought to do for them is unrealistic. I think it might be a bit of both. Who are you talking to? Now don’t worry, I’m not getting into The
Last Jedi at all. That’s a whole bigger issue with crazy expectations
and loads of people have thought about it lots and talked about it really well. I’m staying general and broad. A lot of people hate a lot of films. They call them bad. But what is the definition of a bad film? And you should know when I say film I mean
TV as well ‘cause in this day and age what’s the difference. Is a bad film one where the plot is incomprehensible? Well what about David Lynch? Or could a film be bad because of technical
errors? Maybe, but that’s so rare. Is it a bad film when you can really tell
the CGI is CGI? Well Speed Racer would disagree. Or maybe when the boom is in shot? That and an assortment of obnoxious continuity
errors didn’t stop audiences enjoying stories. Ever. Seriously, there are such egregious errors
in all your favourite films. So it’s not that. You know, in fact I’d go further. I’d say perfect is boring. All my favourite things have serious flaws. Blood in the work. I submit that there is no audio-visual or
technical element we can definitively say makes a bad film. In professional filmmaking, where all the
sound and visuals are at least alright. But hey, say you didn’t like the characters. And that’s why you don’t like the movie. But that doesn’t mean it’s a bad movie. That means you didn’t like the characters. That’s your problem, not the movie’s. Unless the movie wanted you to like the characters. Then the movie failed. But you also failed. Because you didn’t like them. Because it takes two groups to make a good
film – good filmmakers and a good audience. Sometimes all a good film is missing is an
audience who understands it and appreciates it. So this is my advice. For a happier life. Exploit the Principal of Charity. Films are less about what you want or what
you’re expecting, they’re more about what the filmmakers are actually doing or trying
to give you. They’re all gifts, you know, try to appreciate
what you’re given I reckon. The person who doesn’t like a piece of art
should be the most humble. It’s the most piteous position. One ought to either be embarrassed or at least
cautious because clearly one did not understand the film sufficiently. Or wasn’t able to get on its level, to empathise
with it. It’s the person that hates a movie and feels
the need to tell everyone about it that is the most obnoxious, especially if they can’t
define their reasons. Everything is better if there’s a reason. Plus, filmmaking is an enormous institution,
it takes armies of people to make these films. Isn’t it just plain rude to dismiss even
the worst film, and thereby the hard work of so many people? Every single film has redeemable features. Yes, obviously, every single one. That sounds obvious and that is obvious but
I think a lot of people today actually don’t believe it. Despite all this I don’t think it’s right
to simply love everything for the sake of it. Picking apart films is absolutely a good time
I got nothing against that. I love criticism that’s a conversation,
I mean this too is just a conversation. Go on, argue with me. Also I think you’ve gotta stay skeptical
of stuff in movies that’s nefarious or unethical or degrading or insulting or malicious or
immoral. If a film doesn’t have productive messages
or positive effects on people or the world then what’s the point. But I reckon most do. Yeah no I got nothing against being very critical
of films, respectfully. My problem is just this massive wave of people
who just find some kind of satisfaction or superiority in not even bothering to try to
understand the intentions and positive contributions of art. So the next time you don’t like a film,
what are you going to ask yourself? Why. Why indeed, wow you were listening. I’ve done nothing with this at all. Any questions? Yeah alright go’on. Hey guys, thanks for watching this video! This was a fun one you know, and a really interesting
topic, so be sure to let me know what you think. Make sure to like, comment and subscribe. And I’ll see you, next time. Alright, I’ve done it, now let my wife go
you bastard.

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