Pulling the Perfect Key in Avid – 04 – Compositing Tricks

Pulling the Perfect Key in Avid – 04 – Compositing Tricks


– [Ben] Hello and welcome to part four of Pulling the Perfect
Key in Avid with me, Ben Brownlee from Boris FX. And in this section we’re
gonna be looking at starting to tie the foreground and
the background clip together. (playful xylophone music) So the first thing I
wanna do is actually try and get a bit of color
correction going in. So just do a bit of
primary color correction just to balance the two elements out. If I pop back into Primatte
Studio on my foreground clip, take a little look at that one there, we can come in and start
to have a look at some of the other modules we
have down at the bottom. Essentially, we have four
ways of correcting color. We have our main color correction, we have our light wrap color correction, which we’re gonna look at in
a slightly later exercise, and we have our edge
color correction only. I’m gonna start obviously with
the primary color correction. So this is the color correction
that goes over the top of our entire foreground clip. And I can change up
things like temperature to match up the temperature. I can make things a little bit cooler or a little bit warmer. I’ll probably make things
just a tad cooler here just to cool things down. It looks, if we just take a
look at the background itself, it looks like quite a cold day, we don’t have lots of
sunshine shining through here, the ground looks a bit
wet or at least a bit damp and that’s the sort of
feel I also want to have in my foreground as well. So I take the temperature
down a little bit cooler, the tint I can then move
between green and magenta and I might want to again just touch that a little bit closer
towards the greens. Then I have my saturation, so I can make this super saturated. Horrible or I can just
kind of match this in. I’m gonna come back to
saturation in just a moment, so I don’t, I’ll just
leave that near the center if not at the center. And then we have the three controls to control our brightness and contrast. So I have brightness itself. Which again, I’m gonna leave just in zero. If you wanna keep the black
and white levels generally where they are use the gamma instead. And I’m going to use a
combination of contrast and gamma, we’ll get into the
right sort of brightness and contrast levels where I want to be. I actually quite like this
slightly more contrasted look. It does make our knave stick even more out of the background. So you know, if this
isn’t the look you want, if you wanted to have it
sort of even more realistic, we can even come in and sort of maybe, touch the contrast down a little bit. And in the same way, take
the gamma down a bit as well. So this sort of fits in a bit better with the black levels
that we have going on in the original. Actually, this, this
probably isn’t all that bad. I think I’m going to
keep us there actually. And that’s the before and after. Before. And after. I reserve the right to revisit this once we’ve added a few
more elements on top. Okay, so that’s our first
bit of color correction. I’m now going to turn my focus
on to the background instead. So one of the things, we take
a look at the background here. One of the things we
can see if we just look at the background itself, the focal point in the background is probably
around about the plane of this tree here. You can see the stuff in
front is definitely out of focus and the stuff in the back far in the distance is also out of focus, but this is relatively in focus. And that doesn’t fit in for
where we are with our knave. Our knave is much closer to the camera, so this doesn’t make sense. So what I’m going to do
is add a another effect over the top, just to sort
of tie things together a little bit more. And let’s come over to our Effect Palette and I will find a blur. And I’m gonna use the
continuum fast lens blur. And let’s pop into the effect editor and take a look at this. The default iris scale
of 15 is pretty high, you can see that it’s blurring out a lot. We probably only need a touch of this. And I’ll take this down to
about four-ish, should be fine. So let’s just preview that out a bit more. Now one of the other things we can do with the fast lens blur is we
can boost the highlights up. So it starts reacting in this in a sort of more realistic way if
you defocused a camera, then if you just stuck a
Gaussian blur across an image. So I’m going to take the
highlight threshold down till we start seeing, there
we go, start seeing the areas in the background there
and I can boost those up to a place that I quite like. And I’m going to soften those out as well. I can even change the
way this boost works, boost it all the way to
white or just to an RGB glow and I kind of like that RGB glow. And that’s without soften, and with soften. So I find a nice medium there. You see what a big difference that makes as I bring the iris scale back up again, we see a little bit more
of the lens shape there. Now obviously, we don’t really want that, I’m still gonna just bring
that iris scale down again. Yeah that’s starting to look, look pretty good there. Now the problem I’ve got with
this as it is at the moment, is this still just looks
like we’ve put a blur across the entire background image, which is essentially what we’ve done. But built into the Continuum fast blur, we do have our PixelChooser. Now we started to talk a little about what the PixelChooser can do when we were looking at hold in and hold out masks back in exercise three. If I use, if I turn my
PixelChooser on now, I’m just gonna solo out the background. The PixelChooser’s there to limit where the effect is gonna be placed. And we can do that in one
of two different ways. We can either use a matte based off of, you know, Luma, or one
of the color channels or even the alpha channel or
making our own little key, or we can do it based off of a mask and we’ve got various mask shapes, including a Mocha spine
if we want to do that. Or we can do some sort
of gradients as well. So if I do a linear gradient, and let’s turn the iris scale
back up even more there, you can see what that’s doing… There we go, to our image. Wipe that on, and if we don’t
want to use a linear gradient, we want it to affect
both sides differently, we can use a linear double-edge gradient and turn my gradient distance down. You can see that spreading
out from one side. Now I can even come around and
rotate that out a little bit. So start that in the middle. Wipe it a little bit there, so change the gradient distance up. You can view my masks, you can see exactly what
it’s meant to be doing. Be round about there, so it sort of blends into the
center then back out again, which should look quite nice. I’ll turn off view matte mask, I’ll come back in, bring
my iris scale down again. Probably need this a little
bit more over on the edges, it’s not quite doing what I
need it to do in the edges, so I’ll just bring the distance
up a little bit more there. So take that to about, what? 150 ish. 130? Yeah, that’s looking all right. And let’s see how it
looks with a composite. I can bypass it before,
after, before, and after. So we’re starting to get
somewhere with this now. It’s beginning to fit in a bit better now. What I could do, if you have a little look at what’s happening in the foreground, just bypass the lens blur, you can see that at the start of the clip, our guy’s out of focus, and
then he comes into focus around about one second in, so we can replicate that
on the blur as well. So if I just come in and I add a keyframe, and I come to the start,
I’ll add another keyframe and just reduce the iris
scale down a little bit there, we can get that feeling of the rack focus. If the background goes more out of focus, and bringing the foreground into focus. It should help to sell the
shot a little bit more. And with just a couple of little
tweaks we’ve come quite far from where we started at the
beginning of this exercise. Looking at this now if I
want to do one more thing to it actually, I might
just add on a fast flip. So use the Fast Flipper. And I hold down alt onto the background and just flip my trees
over onto the other side, we can see a little bit more
of the background over there. It’s a small thing, but I
think it helps to sell the shot because if you look, we’ve
got the light coming in over on the right-hand side here. And without the fast flipper, bypass that, our light is really more coming in over from the the left-hand side. So at least we’ve got an idea of light popping through over here. And that’s something we’re
gonna build on in exercise five, where we’re going to be
looking at matching lighting to try to bring this whole thing together. And we’re gonna use a couple
more effects that are found within the Boris continuum
package to help sell that, including a bit of lens flare
and some particle effects. All right, so that’s been
looking at primary balance in part four. Join me, Ben Brownlee from Boris FX in part five of pulling
the perfect key in Avid. Thanks for watching. If you have any questions or
comments about Primatte Studio, or any of the other things
you’ve seen in this video, then please leave them below. To learn more about Primatte Studio, or any of the continuum filters, then join us over a BorisFX.com (upbeat music)

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